The combined network CERAMIC APPLICATIONS includes not only industry partners but also associations and working groups such as:

AACCM: Association of American Ceramic Component Manufacturers

AdvanCer – Fraunhofer Alliance for High-Performance Ceramics

Ceramic Composites – a Competence Network of Leading Companies and Research Institutes in the Field of Ceramic Composites

Goal

To have advanced ceramic materials make it to the marketplace where they can be used, manufacturing companies with technologies that form these materials into useful components are needed. In the USA there is an assortment of technical parts manufacturing companies doing just that. And the Association of American Ceramic Component Manufacturers (AACCM) represents a wide spectrum of American ceramic manufacturing businesses that are competing worldwide and serving customers at industrial scale.

Potential members

AACCM companies are required to be producing ceramic components starting from powders, and manufacturing on US soil, as a common means of membership in the trade group. The companies in AACCM are strong and unique, and are leaders in their markets. Member companies range in size from small, family owned, to large, globalized businesses and they all make ceramic components using every possible method known in ceramics, including techniques unique to them or not conventionally used in ceramic manufacture. The components produced are used in virtually every application from modern and new technologies to the existing proven technologies where ceramics are a mainstay.

Information channels

A visit to www.aaccm.org is not only a tool for members to learn about each other but it is a marketing tool for potential customers of ceramic components. However a tour through the list of all 17 AACCM member company’s websites to learn what they do could be time consuming so, instead, all the capabilities and the industries/applications they serve have been summarized on con-venient one page matrix charts. For example, the Industry Matrix shows which AACCM companies make parts for electronic, thermal, material handling/processing, wear, structural/mechanical, raw materials production, and other miscellaneous applications. This chart alone demonstrates the vast experience and capabilities across the AACCM membership and is valuable to both potential customers and encourages inter-member business collaborations.  Another useful reference is the Member Capabilities Matrix, which provides a list of the materials offered by AACCM companies, ranging from oxides and non-oxides, to porous ceramics, ceramic composites/fibers, specialty dielectric ceramics, and ferrites. Also provided on this capabilities chart are all member company forming methods including all types of pressing, extrusion, casting, and injection molding. Very important finishing and added value capabilities are listed here, as well, providing a complete picture of the technical competencies across the entire membership base. And yet if there is still uncertainty as to which company to contact, one can easily send AACCM an email with their general enquiry and it will go to all the member companies for review and consideration.

Structure

AACCM’s mission, as a group, is to advance awareness of ceramic manufacturing products and processes in the US and to concurrently promote education in ceramic materials. AACCM operates independently, and is endorsed by the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). The AACCM Board of Directors meetings are often held at ACerS meetings where ceramic professionals from both industry and academia can network and interact routinely, serving as a forum for subjects on the business and the applications of ceramics. Sometimes AACCM meetings are hosted by member companies and include tours of ceramic manufacturing facilities. Exhibiting at trade fairs is another group activity where AACCM displays example work done by the member businesses to attract potential customers out of expo attendees while also attracting new member companies. The booth personnel are volunteers from member companies who are often ceramists themselves and are knowledgeable of the specific applications the displayed components are used for, or at least for the components that their company manufactured!

Contact

AACCM President
Thomas Henriksen
Ceramco, Inc.
www.ceramcoceramics.com

All contact data of the member companies are published on the AACCM website. Direct contact with the contact partners listed there is also welcomed and is often the preferred option: www.AACCM.org

Current members

Akron Porcelain & Plastics Co.
Astro Met, Inc.
Blasch Precision Ceramics Ceramco, Inc. CeramTec North America Corp.
Du-Co Ceramics Company
Isolantite Mfg. Co, Inc.
Keir Manufacturing, Inc.
Maryland Ceramic & Steatite Co.
Metsch Refractories, Inc.
Refractron Technologies Corp.
Superior Graphite
Superior Technical Ceramics Corp.
Trans-Tech Ceramics and Advanced Materials
Zircoa, Inc.

Goal

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is the leading organization for applied research institutes in Europe. It undertakes contract research for industry, the service and public sectors. For industrial clients, ready-to-use solutions to technical and organizational problems are devised quickly and at low cost. The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance actively supports private and public sector clients with research, development and consultancy services. Scientists and engineers from seven Fraunhofer institutes have bundled their competence in the fields of materials research, ceramic technologies, production engineering, material mechanics, fatigue strength and non-destructive testing methods to form a coordinated range of services aimed at using high-performance ceramics in the creation of individual system solutions for industrial enterprises. The activities at »AdvanCer« include the presentation and demonstration of system solutions with high-performance ceramics as well as training, consultancy and transfer services for manufacturers and user companies.With the increasing requirements to be met by ceramic components, the necessary mechanical, electric, optical, magnetic or chemical properties must be taken into greater consideration in materials development (“microstructural design”). Similarly component geometries must be adapted to ceramic properties (“ceramic-oriented design”). The institutes in the Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance have extensive experience from a large number of applications and for numerous materials.

Potential partners

Membership in the Alliance is restricted to institutes of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. In the scope of project work, national and international cooperation with companies and research institutes is also sought. The Alliance opens up new potential for value creation for its clients in all processing stages (powder preparation, shaping, sintering, finishing). Examples of cost savings are the simulation- assisted optimization of shaping, debinding and sintering processes. Material composite shaping with two-component powder injection moulding, function integration with LTCC technology or precision-machining of ceramic threaded components are examples of the development of innovative fabrication technologies.

Information channels

The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance operates via an office through its member institutes. On the Alliance’s web pages new research findings are published and made available for application in industry. The Alliance can be contacted either via the office in Dresden or directly at the member institutes. For several years now, a training programme has been successfully organized at the institutes.
Training programme:

  • Part I provides a comprehensive overview of the entire technology for the fabrication of high-performance ceramics – from the powder to the component. In addition, the properties and potential applications of these versatile and interesting materials are presented.
  • Part II conveys the knowledge necessary for efficient machining of functional ceramic components. Not only conventional machining methods are presented, but the latest developments in EDM and ultrasonic technologies as well as face grinding with planetary kinematics and flow grinding are explained.
  • Part III provides insights into the selection of relevant testing methods and the determination and correct interpretation of the properties of ceramic materials. The training programme provides the basis for ceramic-oriented design and the introduction of relevant quality assurance methods in internal production operations. The programme often forms the basis for cooperation with the participating companies in follow-on research.

Structure

The Alliance is part of the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft. It is managed by a steering group and represented by an elected spokesperson. The Alliance office in Dresden is responsible for coordination of its activities.

Contacts

Office

Susanne Freund
Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7504
susanne.freund@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Alliance contact

Dr Michael Zins
Tel.:+49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Member institutes

Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung ISC
(Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research)
Contact: Dr Friedrich Raether
Tel.: +49 921 786931-60
friedrich.raether@isc.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien
und Systeme IKTS (Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems)
Contact: Dr Michael Zins
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionsanlagen
und Konstruktionstechnik IPK (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems
and Design Technology)
Contact: M.Sc. Tiago Borsoi Klein
Tel.: +49 30 39006-267
tiago.borsoi.klein@ipk.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology)
Contact: Dipl.-Ing. Axel Demmer
Tel.: +49 241 8904-130
axel.demmer@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoffmechanik IWM
(Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials)
Contact: Dr Andreas Kailer
Tel.: +49 761 5142-247
andreas.kailer@iwm.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP (Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing Methods)
Contact: Dr Michael Maisl
Tel.: +49 681 9302-3825
michael.maisl@izfp.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlässigkeit LBF (Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability)
Contact: Dr Klaus Lipp
Tel.: +49 6151 705-243
klaus.lipp@lbf.fraunhofer.de

Ceramic Composites was founded in November 2008 and is an alliance of companies and research institutes in the field of ceramic composites. Ceramic Composites is a specialist section (currently with around 60 members) in the Carbon Composites association (currently around 170 members). Carbon Composites e.V. (CCeV) is an association that covers the entire value-added chain of high-performance fibre composites in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (currently around 170 members). The potential of ceramic composites is where high application temperatures are combined with a high mechanical load and, in some cases, oxidizing ambient conditions. Brake discs in automotive engineering, heat shields on spacecraft, components for furnace engineering and crucibles for crystal growing are examples of applications that have already been developed. Purpose of the section is to promote the application of ceramic composites and their components, like, for example, fibres or matrix materials, based on the build-up and widening of scientific and technical expertise, as well as realization of a competence network for the research and development of materials and processes for the production of market-viable products made from ceramic composites. The goal of the Ceramic Composites section in the CCeV association is to give its members advantages in the sale and use of ceramic composites based on common initiatives to develop products and technology, and to open up new markets. The focus is on establishing production-ready processes and marketable products.

To this end, the section provides the following services:

  • Creation of a competence network that comprises all links in the value-added chain from research and development, production, quality assurance and application behaviour of ceramic composites and their pre-products
  • Support in the development and provision of a scientific and technical infrastructure
  • Initiation and support of cooperation structures between industrial enterprises and scientific institutes
  • Formation of specialist working groups for technology and knowledge management
  • Initiation and, if required, coordination of projects in the field of ceramic composites
  • Assistance in application for public funding for development and technology projects
  • Provision and exchange of information on new developments in the field of ceramic composites
  • Representation of common interests of the members to government institutions and organizations
  • Concerted public relations work
  • Promotion of training and qualification measures in the field of ceramic composites, their precursor products and applications.

Contact:

Dr Peter Stingl
Section Secretary Ceramic Composites Office
Gottlieb-Keim-Strasse 60
95448 Bayreuth, Germany
Tel.: 49 (0) 921 786931 93 or +49 (0) 9123 12862
Mobile: +49 (0) 170 9675028
E-mail: peter.stingl@ceramic-composites.eu

EuTeCer – the European Technical Ceramics Federation under the Roof of Cerame-Unie

Expert Group for Ceramic Injection Moulding (CIM) under the Roof of the German Ceramic Society (DKG)

Forschungsinstitut für anorganische Werkstoffe -Glas/Keramik-GmbH

Goal

To have advanced ceramic materials make it to the marketplace where they can be used, manufacturing companies with technologies that form these materials into useful components are needed. In the USA there is an assortment of technical parts manufacturing companies doing just that. And the Association of American Ceramic Component Manufacturers (AACCM) represents a wide spectrum of American ceramic manufacturing businesses that are competing worldwide and serving customers at industrial scale.

Potential members

AACCM companies are required to be producing ceramic components starting from powders, and manufacturing on US soil, as a common means of membership in the trade group. The companies in AACCM are strong and unique, and are leaders in their markets. Member companies range in size from small, family owned, to large, globalized businesses and they all make ceramic components using every possible method known in ceramics, including techniques unique to them or not conventionally used in ceramic manufacture. The components produced are used in virtually every application from modern and new technologies to the existing proven technologies where ceramics are a mainstay.

Information channels

A visit to www.aaccm.org is not only a tool for members to learn about each other but it is a marketing tool for potential customers of ceramic components. However a tour through the list of all 17 AACCM member company’s websites to learn what they do could be time consuming so, instead, all the capabilities and the industries/applications they serve have been summarized on con-venient one page matrix charts. For example, the Industry Matrix shows which AACCM companies make parts for electronic, thermal, material handling/processing, wear, structural/mechanical, raw materials production, and other miscellaneous applications. This chart alone demonstrates the vast experience and capabilities across the AACCM membership and is valuable to both potential customers and encourages inter-member business collaborations.  Another useful reference is the Member Capabilities Matrix, which provides a list of the materials offered by AACCM companies, ranging from oxides and non-oxides, to porous ceramics, ceramic composites/fibers, specialty dielectric ceramics, and ferrites. Also provided on this capabilities chart are all member company forming methods including all types of pressing, extrusion, casting, and injection molding. Very important finishing and added value capabilities are listed here, as well, providing a complete picture of the technical competencies across the entire membership base. And yet if there is still uncertainty as to which company to contact, one can easily send AACCM an email with their general enquiry and it will go to all the member companies for review and consideration.

Structure

AACCM’s mission, as a group, is to advance awareness of ceramic manufacturing products and processes in the US and to concurrently promote education in ceramic materials. AACCM operates independently, and is endorsed by the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). The AACCM Board of Directors meetings are often held at ACerS meetings where ceramic professionals from both industry and academia can network and interact routinely, serving as a forum for subjects on the business and the applications of ceramics. Sometimes AACCM meetings are hosted by member companies and include tours of ceramic manufacturing facilities. Exhibiting at trade fairs is another group activity where AACCM displays example work done by the member businesses to attract potential customers out of expo attendees while also attracting new member companies. The booth personnel are volunteers from member companies who are often ceramists themselves and are knowledgeable of the specific applications the displayed components are used for, or at least for the components that their company manufactured!

Contact

AACCM President
Thomas Henriksen
Ceramco, Inc.
www.ceramcoceramics.com

All contact data of the member companies are published on the AACCM website. Direct contact with the contact partners listed there is also welcomed and is often the preferred option: www.AACCM.org

Current members

Akron Porcelain & Plastics Co.
Astro Met, Inc.
Blasch Precision Ceramics Ceramco, Inc. CeramTec North America Corp.
Du-Co Ceramics Company
Isolantite Mfg. Co, Inc.
Keir Manufacturing, Inc.
Maryland Ceramic & Steatite Co.
Metsch Refractories, Inc.
Refractron Technologies Corp.
Superior Graphite
Superior Technical Ceramics Corp.
Trans-Tech Ceramics and Advanced Materials
Zircoa, Inc.

Goal

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is the leading organization for applied research institutes in Europe. It undertakes contract research for industry, the service and public sectors. For industrial clients, ready-to-use solutions to technical and organizational problems are devised quickly and at low cost. The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance actively supports private and public sector clients with research, development and consultancy services. Scientists and engineers from seven Fraunhofer institutes have bundled their competence in the fields of materials research, ceramic technologies, production engineering, material mechanics, fatigue strength and non-destructive testing methods to form a coordinated range of services aimed at using high-performance ceramics in the creation of individual system solutions for industrial enterprises. The activities at »AdvanCer« include the presentation and demonstration of system solutions with high-performance ceramics as well as training, consultancy and transfer services for manufacturers and user companies.With the increasing requirements to be met by ceramic components, the necessary mechanical, electric, optical, magnetic or chemical properties must be taken into greater consideration in materials development (“microstructural design”). Similarly component geometries must be adapted to ceramic properties (“ceramic-oriented design”). The institutes in the Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance have extensive experience from a large number of applications and for numerous materials.

Potential partners

Membership in the Alliance is restricted to institutes of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. In the scope of project work, national and international cooperation with companies and research institutes is also sought. The Alliance opens up new potential for value creation for its clients in all processing stages (powder preparation, shaping, sintering, finishing). Examples of cost savings are the simulation- assisted optimization of shaping, debinding and sintering processes. Material composite shaping with two-component powder injection moulding, function integration with LTCC technology or precision-machining of ceramic threaded components are examples of the development of innovative fabrication technologies.

Information channels

The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance operates via an office through its member institutes. On the Alliance’s web pages new research findings are published and made available for application in industry. The Alliance can be contacted either via the office in Dresden or directly at the member institutes. For several years now, a training programme has been successfully organized at the institutes.
Training programme:

  • Part I provides a comprehensive overview of the entire technology for the fabrication of high-performance ceramics – from the powder to the component. In addition, the properties and potential applications of these versatile and interesting materials are presented.
  • Part II conveys the knowledge necessary for efficient machining of functional ceramic components. Not only conventional machining methods are presented, but the latest developments in EDM and ultrasonic technologies as well as face grinding with planetary kinematics and flow grinding are explained.
  • Part III provides insights into the selection of relevant testing methods and the determination and correct interpretation of the properties of ceramic materials. The training programme provides the basis for ceramic-oriented design and the introduction of relevant quality assurance methods in internal production operations. The programme often forms the basis for cooperation with the participating companies in follow-on research.

Structure

The Alliance is part of the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft. It is managed by a steering group and represented by an elected spokesperson. The Alliance office in Dresden is responsible for coordination of its activities.

Contacts

Office

Susanne Freund
Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7504
susanne.freund@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Alliance contact

Dr Michael Zins
Tel.:+49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Member institutes

Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung ISC
(Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research)
Contact: Dr Friedrich Raether
Tel.: +49 921 786931-60
friedrich.raether@isc.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien
und Systeme IKTS (Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems)
Contact: Dr Michael Zins
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionsanlagen
und Konstruktionstechnik IPK (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems
and Design Technology)
Contact: M.Sc. Tiago Borsoi Klein
Tel.: +49 30 39006-267
tiago.borsoi.klein@ipk.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology)
Contact: Dipl.-Ing. Axel Demmer
Tel.: +49 241 8904-130
axel.demmer@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoffmechanik IWM
(Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials)
Contact: Dr Andreas Kailer
Tel.: +49 761 5142-247
andreas.kailer@iwm.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP (Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing Methods)
Contact: Dr Michael Maisl
Tel.: +49 681 9302-3825
michael.maisl@izfp.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlässigkeit LBF (Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability)
Contact: Dr Klaus Lipp
Tel.: +49 6151 705-243
klaus.lipp@lbf.fraunhofer.de

Ceramic Composites was founded in November 2008 and is an alliance of companies and research institutes in the field of ceramic composites. Ceramic Composites is a specialist section (currently with around 60 members) in the Carbon Composites association (currently around 170 members). Carbon Composites e.V. (CCeV) is an association that covers the entire value-added chain of high-performance fibre composites in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (currently around 170 members). The potential of ceramic composites is where high application temperatures are combined with a high mechanical load and, in some cases, oxidizing ambient conditions. Brake discs in automotive engineering, heat shields on spacecraft, components for furnace engineering and crucibles for crystal growing are examples of applications that have already been developed. Purpose of the section is to promote the application of ceramic composites and their components, like, for example, fibres or matrix materials, based on the build-up and widening of scientific and technical expertise, as well as realization of a competence network for the research and development of materials and processes for the production of market-viable products made from ceramic composites. The goal of the Ceramic Composites section in the CCeV association is to give its members advantages in the sale and use of ceramic composites based on common initiatives to develop products and technology, and to open up new markets. The focus is on establishing production-ready processes and marketable products.

To this end, the section provides the following services:

  • Creation of a competence network that comprises all links in the value-added chain from research and development, production, quality assurance and application behaviour of ceramic composites and their pre-products
  • Support in the development and provision of a scientific and technical infrastructure
  • Initiation and support of cooperation structures between industrial enterprises and scientific institutes
  • Formation of specialist working groups for technology and knowledge management
  • Initiation and, if required, coordination of projects in the field of ceramic composites
  • Assistance in application for public funding for development and technology projects
  • Provision and exchange of information on new developments in the field of ceramic composites
  • Representation of common interests of the members to government institutions and organizations
  • Concerted public relations work
  • Promotion of training and qualification measures in the field of ceramic composites, their precursor products and applications.

Contact:

Dr Peter Stingl
Section Secretary Ceramic Composites Office
Gottlieb-Keim-Strasse 60
95448 Bayreuth, Germany
Tel.: 49 (0) 921 786931 93 or +49 (0) 9123 12862
Mobile: +49 (0) 170 9675028
E-mail: peter.stingl@ceramic-composites.eu

Goal

EuTeCer, the European Technical Ceramics Federation, is the voice of the European technical ceramic industry, located in Brussels.

EuTeCer has no commercial aim. According to its statutes, the association has as its object:

  • to deal with all economic, technical and administrative matters of interest to its members in order to promote understanding and co-operation;
  • to represent the common interests of the industry with the institutions of the European Union and with other relevant institutions.

EuTeCer is a member of Cerame-Unie, the European Ceramic Industry Association. Through Cerame-Unie, the interests and concerns common to the whole of the ceramics industry are communicated towards the European institutions.

Potential members

The members of EuTeCer are national associations of European countries, which represent the interests of the technical ceramics manufacturing industry. If no national association exists in their country, individual companies may be admitted as associated members. As EuTeCer is a European association, it actively seeks new members in as many European countries as possible. Currently, EuTeCer unites the national associations from Germany, Great Britain, France, Turkey and Romania.

Information channels

Since 2010, EuTeCer publishes a yearly activity report providing an overview of the main activities of the association. This report is published on the Cerame-Unie website.

In addition, every year 5 newsletters are circulated to EuTeCer members. The topics covered in these newsletters range from EU policy information and public consultations to conference highlights. National associations also contribute with at least one article per year, providing a domestic viewpoint.

Further information about technical ceramics and the ceramic industry in general can be found on the website of Cerame-Unie (www.cerameunie.eu). Cerame-Unie is also active on Twitter (@Cerameunie) and LinkedIn.

Structure

EuTeCer has a rotating President (currently Joachim Heym, CEO of Schunk Ingenieurkeramik GmbH/DE). The day to day work is carried out by the Secretariat located in Brussels/BE. EuTeCer organises two meetings a year, one in April and a General Assembly in November. In the past, the April meetings were organised in conjunction with CERAMITEC or the Hannover Messe. These meetings are open to all EuTeCer members (the national associations and the companies which are member of these national associations). External experts can be invited as guest speakers to these meetings.

Current members

Currently, five national associations are EuTeCer members:

France: Syndicat des Industriels des Céramiques Techniques, SICT (www.ceramique-technique.com)

Germany: Verband der Keramischen industrie e.V., VKI (www.keramverbaende.de)

Turkey: Türkiye Seramik Federasyonu, SEREF (www.serfed.com)

Romania: The Employer’s Organisation of the Glass and Fine Ceramic Industry, STICEF (www.dce.gov.ro/Info_business/RoExpDir/Sticef_2010/Sticef/prez_STICEF_E.htm)

Great Britain: British Ceramic Confederation (www.ceramfed.co.uk)

Companies or associations located in other countries having an interest to learn more about EuTeCer can contact the EuTeCer Secretariat (sec@cerameunie.eu).

Contact

Astrid Volckaert
Volckaert@cerameunie.eu
Secretary-General EuTeCer
Rue de la Montagne 17
1000 Brussels
Belgium

www.cerameunie.eu

Phone: +32 2 808 38 80
Fax: +32 2 511 51 74

Objective

In 2008 some German ceramic part producers, raw material suppliers and a research institute came together. They decided to found a group dedicated to the technique of ceramic injection moulding (CIM). The main aim of the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” (Expert Group for Ceramic Injection Moulding) is the development of the whole ceramic injection moulding process to increase key aspects such as part precision, process reliability and cost-effectiveness. With the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss”, the various partners are establishing a corporate brand “Keramikspritzguss” in Germany and Europe to provide optimum customer value and to strengthen the position with respect to the global competition. Moreover students of various disciplines are in the focus of the group. The aim is to increase awareness of the technology and to plant the seed of knowledge in the next rising generation of engineers.

CIM Process

During ceramic injection moulding (CIM) ceramic feedstocks, a homogeneous mixture out of thermoplastic binder and ceramic powder, are injected with high pressure into the cavity of a mould in the injection moulding machine. The part geometry is completely mapped. The thermoplastic binder guarantees the shaping of the part above its melting point and also the secure and dimensionally stable deforming after a short cooling phase in the mould. After debinding, i.e. removal of the plastic binder, the “brown” part is densely sintered in a furnace to achieve the final ceramic properties. Injection moulding is widely used in the plastics industry to produce complex and intricate components – the CIM-technique makes this approach possible for ceramics. The key advantage of CIM is the near-net-shaping design of the parts. Complex geometries with narrow tolerances of <0,3% as well as very good surface qualities are reached and do not need an elaborate cost-intensive post-processing. Mass production to the highest quality standards is now feasible for highly sophisticated micro-parts and parts with a weight up to two kilograms. Unimagined potential is opened up for the design of sustainable products and system-solutions. Parts made by injection moulding can be found in many different industrial branches: automotive, lighting, textile, jewelry and dentistry, as well as electronics, sensors and medical devices. Both, structural (thread guides, dies, toothed wheels, sealings, surgery instruments, ferrules, watches aso.) as well as functional ceramic parts (dielectric components, micro-heaters, electric resistors and isolators, lambda sensors aso.) are in the field.
The most rapid growing markets for European CIM-parts are thought to be the automotive and the jewelry, the electronic and medical and dental industry. Worldwide the number of companies using powder injection moulding (PIM) in all varieties is estimated with more than 300. 25 % of the companies focus on the production of ceramic and hard-metal parts by CIM. Out of the companies producing in Europe more than half of them are located in Germany. Currently the CIM-markets which grow fastest and strongest are situated in Europe and Asia.

Members

The CIM Expert Group was founded in 2008 and its members include CIM producers and suppliers, as well as ceramic and materials research institutes. All members are German-speaking and need to have the whole process chain in house.

Information channels

The “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” uses different media. The group is present on selected fairs and exhibitions, seminars, specific to students and the regional industry, are conducted in universities and high schools for applied sciences. On the homepage each member has the space for a presentation, here contacts are made either to the group or a single member. Publications and press releases inform about the current topics of the group. Market needs are answered by research cooperation or member-collaboration looking for diverse tasks and solutions. Research results and findings are published.

Structure

Two times a year plenary sessions are held where the work groups report. The work group “Technological Development” cares for the need to further develop an understanding of specific aspects of the CIM process while the work group “Technological Marketing” is committed to pursuing the goal of increasing both awareness of the potential of CIM technology and the general level of understanding of the process. Both groups meet several times a year.

Contact

Contact to the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” can be made via the homepage
www.keramikspritzguss.eu
Contact persons are the chairman of the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss”:
Dr Tassilo Moritz/Fraunhofer IKTS
(Tassilo.Moritz@ikts.fraunhofer.de)
and the two substitutes
Dr Moritz v. Witzleben/INMATEC Technologies GmbH
Moritz.von.Witzleben@inmatec-gmbh.com
Hartmut Walcher/ARBURG GmbH & Co. KG
h.walcher@arburg.com

Forschungsinstitut
für anorganische Werkstoffe
-Glas/Keramik-GmbH

Heinrich-Meister-Straße 2
56203 Höhr-Grenzhausen
Germany
Phone: +49 2624/186-0
Fax: +49 2624/6440
info@fgk-keramik.de
www.fgk-keramik.de

Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering (IWM) RWTH Aachen University

Technical Committee on Material Applications within the German Ceramic Society (DKG)

VKI – Think Ceramics: Technical Ceramics in Practical Applications

Goal

To have advanced ceramic materials make it to the marketplace where they can be used, manufacturing companies with technologies that form these materials into useful components are needed. In the USA there is an assortment of technical parts manufacturing companies doing just that. And the Association of American Ceramic Component Manufacturers (AACCM) represents a wide spectrum of American ceramic manufacturing businesses that are competing worldwide and serving customers at industrial scale.

Potential members

AACCM companies are required to be producing ceramic components starting from powders, and manufacturing on US soil, as a common means of membership in the trade group. The companies in AACCM are strong and unique, and are leaders in their markets. Member companies range in size from small, family owned, to large, globalized businesses and they all make ceramic components using every possible method known in ceramics, including techniques unique to them or not conventionally used in ceramic manufacture. The components produced are used in virtually every application from modern and new technologies to the existing proven technologies where ceramics are a mainstay.

Information channels

A visit to www.aaccm.org is not only a tool for members to learn about each other but it is a marketing tool for potential customers of ceramic components. However a tour through the list of all 17 AACCM member company’s websites to learn what they do could be time consuming so, instead, all the capabilities and the industries/applications they serve have been summarized on con-venient one page matrix charts. For example, the Industry Matrix shows which AACCM companies make parts for electronic, thermal, material handling/processing, wear, structural/mechanical, raw materials production, and other miscellaneous applications. This chart alone demonstrates the vast experience and capabilities across the AACCM membership and is valuable to both potential customers and encourages inter-member business collaborations.  Another useful reference is the Member Capabilities Matrix, which provides a list of the materials offered by AACCM companies, ranging from oxides and non-oxides, to porous ceramics, ceramic composites/fibers, specialty dielectric ceramics, and ferrites. Also provided on this capabilities chart are all member company forming methods including all types of pressing, extrusion, casting, and injection molding. Very important finishing and added value capabilities are listed here, as well, providing a complete picture of the technical competencies across the entire membership base. And yet if there is still uncertainty as to which company to contact, one can easily send AACCM an email with their general enquiry and it will go to all the member companies for review and consideration.

Structure

AACCM’s mission, as a group, is to advance awareness of ceramic manufacturing products and processes in the US and to concurrently promote education in ceramic materials. AACCM operates independently, and is endorsed by the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). The AACCM Board of Directors meetings are often held at ACerS meetings where ceramic professionals from both industry and academia can network and interact routinely, serving as a forum for subjects on the business and the applications of ceramics. Sometimes AACCM meetings are hosted by member companies and include tours of ceramic manufacturing facilities. Exhibiting at trade fairs is another group activity where AACCM displays example work done by the member businesses to attract potential customers out of expo attendees while also attracting new member companies. The booth personnel are volunteers from member companies who are often ceramists themselves and are knowledgeable of the specific applications the displayed components are used for, or at least for the components that their company manufactured!

Contact

AACCM President
Thomas Henriksen
Ceramco, Inc.
www.ceramcoceramics.com

All contact data of the member companies are published on the AACCM website. Direct contact with the contact partners listed there is also welcomed and is often the preferred option: www.AACCM.org

Current members

Akron Porcelain & Plastics Co.
Astro Met, Inc.
Blasch Precision Ceramics Ceramco, Inc. CeramTec North America Corp.
Du-Co Ceramics Company
Isolantite Mfg. Co, Inc.
Keir Manufacturing, Inc.
Maryland Ceramic & Steatite Co.
Metsch Refractories, Inc.
Refractron Technologies Corp.
Superior Graphite
Superior Technical Ceramics Corp.
Trans-Tech Ceramics and Advanced Materials
Zircoa, Inc.

Goal

The Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is the leading organization for applied research institutes in Europe. It undertakes contract research for industry, the service and public sectors. For industrial clients, ready-to-use solutions to technical and organizational problems are devised quickly and at low cost. The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance actively supports private and public sector clients with research, development and consultancy services. Scientists and engineers from seven Fraunhofer institutes have bundled their competence in the fields of materials research, ceramic technologies, production engineering, material mechanics, fatigue strength and non-destructive testing methods to form a coordinated range of services aimed at using high-performance ceramics in the creation of individual system solutions for industrial enterprises. The activities at »AdvanCer« include the presentation and demonstration of system solutions with high-performance ceramics as well as training, consultancy and transfer services for manufacturers and user companies.With the increasing requirements to be met by ceramic components, the necessary mechanical, electric, optical, magnetic or chemical properties must be taken into greater consideration in materials development (“microstructural design”). Similarly component geometries must be adapted to ceramic properties (“ceramic-oriented design”). The institutes in the Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance have extensive experience from a large number of applications and for numerous materials.

Potential partners

Membership in the Alliance is restricted to institutes of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft. In the scope of project work, national and international cooperation with companies and research institutes is also sought. The Alliance opens up new potential for value creation for its clients in all processing stages (powder preparation, shaping, sintering, finishing). Examples of cost savings are the simulation- assisted optimization of shaping, debinding and sintering processes. Material composite shaping with two-component powder injection moulding, function integration with LTCC technology or precision-machining of ceramic threaded components are examples of the development of innovative fabrication technologies.

Information channels

The Fraunhofer AdvanCer Alliance operates via an office through its member institutes. On the Alliance’s web pages new research findings are published and made available for application in industry. The Alliance can be contacted either via the office in Dresden or directly at the member institutes. For several years now, a training programme has been successfully organized at the institutes.
Training programme:

  • Part I provides a comprehensive overview of the entire technology for the fabrication of high-performance ceramics – from the powder to the component. In addition, the properties and potential applications of these versatile and interesting materials are presented.
  • Part II conveys the knowledge necessary for efficient machining of functional ceramic components. Not only conventional machining methods are presented, but the latest developments in EDM and ultrasonic technologies as well as face grinding with planetary kinematics and flow grinding are explained.
  • Part III provides insights into the selection of relevant testing methods and the determination and correct interpretation of the properties of ceramic materials. The training programme provides the basis for ceramic-oriented design and the introduction of relevant quality assurance methods in internal production operations. The programme often forms the basis for cooperation with the participating companies in follow-on research.

Structure

The Alliance is part of the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft. It is managed by a steering group and represented by an elected spokesperson. The Alliance office in Dresden is responsible for coordination of its activities.

Contacts

Office

Susanne Freund
Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277 Dresden, Germany
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7504
susanne.freund@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Alliance contact

Dr Michael Zins
Tel.:+49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Member institutes

Fraunhofer-Institut für Silicatforschung ISC
(Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research)
Contact: Dr Friedrich Raether
Tel.: +49 921 786931-60
friedrich.raether@isc.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Keramische Technologien
und Systeme IKTS (Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems)
Contact: Dr Michael Zins
Tel.: +49 351 2553-7522
michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionsanlagen
und Konstruktionstechnik IPK (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems
and Design Technology)
Contact: M.Sc. Tiago Borsoi Klein
Tel.: +49 30 39006-267
tiago.borsoi.klein@ipk.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT (Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology)
Contact: Dipl.-Ing. Axel Demmer
Tel.: +49 241 8904-130
axel.demmer@ipt.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Werkstoffmechanik IWM
(Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials)
Contact: Dr Andreas Kailer
Tel.: +49 761 5142-247
andreas.kailer@iwm.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP (Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing Methods)
Contact: Dr Michael Maisl
Tel.: +49 681 9302-3825
michael.maisl@izfp.fraunhofer.de

Fraunhofer-Institut für Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlässigkeit LBF (Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability)
Contact: Dr Klaus Lipp
Tel.: +49 6151 705-243
klaus.lipp@lbf.fraunhofer.de

Ceramic Composites was founded in November 2008 and is an alliance of companies and research institutes in the field of ceramic composites. Ceramic Composites is a specialist section (currently with around 60 members) in the Carbon Composites association (currently around 170 members). Carbon Composites e.V. (CCeV) is an association that covers the entire value-added chain of high-performance fibre composites in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (currently around 170 members). The potential of ceramic composites is where high application temperatures are combined with a high mechanical load and, in some cases, oxidizing ambient conditions. Brake discs in automotive engineering, heat shields on spacecraft, components for furnace engineering and crucibles for crystal growing are examples of applications that have already been developed. Purpose of the section is to promote the application of ceramic composites and their components, like, for example, fibres or matrix materials, based on the build-up and widening of scientific and technical expertise, as well as realization of a competence network for the research and development of materials and processes for the production of market-viable products made from ceramic composites. The goal of the Ceramic Composites section in the CCeV association is to give its members advantages in the sale and use of ceramic composites based on common initiatives to develop products and technology, and to open up new markets. The focus is on establishing production-ready processes and marketable products.

To this end, the section provides the following services:

  • Creation of a competence network that comprises all links in the value-added chain from research and development, production, quality assurance and application behaviour of ceramic composites and their pre-products
  • Support in the development and provision of a scientific and technical infrastructure
  • Initiation and support of cooperation structures between industrial enterprises and scientific institutes
  • Formation of specialist working groups for technology and knowledge management
  • Initiation and, if required, coordination of projects in the field of ceramic composites
  • Assistance in application for public funding for development and technology projects
  • Provision and exchange of information on new developments in the field of ceramic composites
  • Representation of common interests of the members to government institutions and organizations
  • Concerted public relations work
  • Promotion of training and qualification measures in the field of ceramic composites, their precursor products and applications.

Contact:

Dr Peter Stingl
Section Secretary Ceramic Composites Office
Gottlieb-Keim-Strasse 60
95448 Bayreuth, Germany
Tel.: 49 (0) 921 786931 93 or +49 (0) 9123 12862
Mobile: +49 (0) 170 9675028
E-mail: peter.stingl@ceramic-composites.eu

Goal

EuTeCer, the European Technical Ceramics Federation, is the voice of the European technical ceramic industry, located in Brussels.

EuTeCer has no commercial aim. According to its statutes, the association has as its object:

  • to deal with all economic, technical and administrative matters of interest to its members in order to promote understanding and co-operation;
  • to represent the common interests of the industry with the institutions of the European Union and with other relevant institutions.

EuTeCer is a member of Cerame-Unie, the European Ceramic Industry Association. Through Cerame-Unie, the interests and concerns common to the whole of the ceramics industry are communicated towards the European institutions.

Potential members

The members of EuTeCer are national associations of European countries, which represent the interests of the technical ceramics manufacturing industry. If no national association exists in their country, individual companies may be admitted as associated members. As EuTeCer is a European association, it actively seeks new members in as many European countries as possible. Currently, EuTeCer unites the national associations from Germany, Great Britain, France, Turkey and Romania.

Information channels

Since 2010, EuTeCer publishes a yearly activity report providing an overview of the main activities of the association. This report is published on the Cerame-Unie website.

In addition, every year 5 newsletters are circulated to EuTeCer members. The topics covered in these newsletters range from EU policy information and public consultations to conference highlights. National associations also contribute with at least one article per year, providing a domestic viewpoint.

Further information about technical ceramics and the ceramic industry in general can be found on the website of Cerame-Unie (www.cerameunie.eu). Cerame-Unie is also active on Twitter (@Cerameunie) and LinkedIn.

Structure

EuTeCer has a rotating President (currently Joachim Heym, CEO of Schunk Ingenieurkeramik GmbH/DE). The day to day work is carried out by the Secretariat located in Brussels/BE. EuTeCer organises two meetings a year, one in April and a General Assembly in November. In the past, the April meetings were organised in conjunction with CERAMITEC or the Hannover Messe. These meetings are open to all EuTeCer members (the national associations and the companies which are member of these national associations). External experts can be invited as guest speakers to these meetings.

Current members

Currently, five national associations are EuTeCer members:

France: Syndicat des Industriels des Céramiques Techniques, SICT (www.ceramique-technique.com)

Germany: Verband der Keramischen industrie e.V., VKI (www.keramverbaende.de)

Turkey: Türkiye Seramik Federasyonu, SEREF (www.serfed.com)

Romania: The Employer’s Organisation of the Glass and Fine Ceramic Industry, STICEF (www.dce.gov.ro/Info_business/RoExpDir/Sticef_2010/Sticef/prez_STICEF_E.htm)

Great Britain: British Ceramic Confederation (www.ceramfed.co.uk)

Companies or associations located in other countries having an interest to learn more about EuTeCer can contact the EuTeCer Secretariat (sec@cerameunie.eu).

Contact

Astrid Volckaert
Volckaert@cerameunie.eu
Secretary-General EuTeCer
Rue de la Montagne 17
1000 Brussels
Belgium

www.cerameunie.eu

Phone: +32 2 808 38 80
Fax: +32 2 511 51 74

Objective

In 2008 some German ceramic part producers, raw material suppliers and a research institute came together. They decided to found a group dedicated to the technique of ceramic injection moulding (CIM). The main aim of the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” (Expert Group for Ceramic Injection Moulding) is the development of the whole ceramic injection moulding process to increase key aspects such as part precision, process reliability and cost-effectiveness. With the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss”, the various partners are establishing a corporate brand “Keramikspritzguss” in Germany and Europe to provide optimum customer value and to strengthen the position with respect to the global competition. Moreover students of various disciplines are in the focus of the group. The aim is to increase awareness of the technology and to plant the seed of knowledge in the next rising generation of engineers.

CIM Process

During ceramic injection moulding (CIM) ceramic feedstocks, a homogeneous mixture out of thermoplastic binder and ceramic powder, are injected with high pressure into the cavity of a mould in the injection moulding machine. The part geometry is completely mapped. The thermoplastic binder guarantees the shaping of the part above its melting point and also the secure and dimensionally stable deforming after a short cooling phase in the mould. After debinding, i.e. removal of the plastic binder, the “brown” part is densely sintered in a furnace to achieve the final ceramic properties. Injection moulding is widely used in the plastics industry to produce complex and intricate components – the CIM-technique makes this approach possible for ceramics. The key advantage of CIM is the near-net-shaping design of the parts. Complex geometries with narrow tolerances of <0,3% as well as very good surface qualities are reached and do not need an elaborate cost-intensive post-processing. Mass production to the highest quality standards is now feasible for highly sophisticated micro-parts and parts with a weight up to two kilograms. Unimagined potential is opened up for the design of sustainable products and system-solutions. Parts made by injection moulding can be found in many different industrial branches: automotive, lighting, textile, jewelry and dentistry, as well as electronics, sensors and medical devices. Both, structural (thread guides, dies, toothed wheels, sealings, surgery instruments, ferrules, watches aso.) as well as functional ceramic parts (dielectric components, micro-heaters, electric resistors and isolators, lambda sensors aso.) are in the field.
The most rapid growing markets for European CIM-parts are thought to be the automotive and the jewelry, the electronic and medical and dental industry. Worldwide the number of companies using powder injection moulding (PIM) in all varieties is estimated with more than 300. 25 % of the companies focus on the production of ceramic and hard-metal parts by CIM. Out of the companies producing in Europe more than half of them are located in Germany. Currently the CIM-markets which grow fastest and strongest are situated in Europe and Asia.

Members

The CIM Expert Group was founded in 2008 and its members include CIM producers and suppliers, as well as ceramic and materials research institutes. All members are German-speaking and need to have the whole process chain in house.

Information channels

The “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” uses different media. The group is present on selected fairs and exhibitions, seminars, specific to students and the regional industry, are conducted in universities and high schools for applied sciences. On the homepage each member has the space for a presentation, here contacts are made either to the group or a single member. Publications and press releases inform about the current topics of the group. Market needs are answered by research cooperation or member-collaboration looking for diverse tasks and solutions. Research results and findings are published.

Structure

Two times a year plenary sessions are held where the work groups report. The work group “Technological Development” cares for the need to further develop an understanding of specific aspects of the CIM process while the work group “Technological Marketing” is committed to pursuing the goal of increasing both awareness of the potential of CIM technology and the general level of understanding of the process. Both groups meet several times a year.

Contact

Contact to the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss” can be made via the homepage
www.keramikspritzguss.eu
Contact persons are the chairman of the “Expertenkreis Keramikspritzguss”:
Dr Tassilo Moritz/Fraunhofer IKTS
(Tassilo.Moritz@ikts.fraunhofer.de)
and the two substitutes
Dr Moritz v. Witzleben/INMATEC Technologies GmbH
Moritz.von.Witzleben@inmatec-gmbh.com
Hartmut Walcher/ARBURG GmbH & Co. KG
h.walcher@arburg.com

Forschungsinstitut
für anorganische Werkstoffe
-Glas/Keramik-GmbH

Heinrich-Meister-Straße 2
56203 Höhr-Grenzhausen
Germany
Phone: +49 2624/186-0
Fax: +49 2624/6440
info@fgk-keramik.de
www.fgk-keramik.de

Research profile 

The Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering (IWM) was formed in 2006 through the merger of the Institute of Materials Science and Ceramic Components in Mechanical Engineering. Closely linked to the IWM is the affiliated institute IPAK (Institute for Processing and Application of Ceramic at the RWTH Aachen University).

Corresponding to their research topics the institute is structured into four Departments: Mechanics of Materials, Rolling Contact Fatigue, Powder Technology and Wear, Material Development and Heat Treatment. The research focuses on powder metallurgical materials such as PM-steels, cemented carbides, engineering ceramics, conventional steels, non-ferrous metals, and cast iron.

Research topics encompass damage and continuum mechanics and lifetime analysis, respectively. In the center of interest are fatigue and failure mechanisms under uniaxial and multi-axial static, cyclic and creep loading and in particular the interaction between microstructural, mechanical, and physical properties. For more precise lifetime prediction, modelling of multiphase materials, fatigue and damage evolution are simulated in both the low cycle and high cycle fatigue regime of multiphase materials by applying a continuum mechanics based multiscale approach. In order to control mechanical or physical properties, thermodynamic modelling, heat treatment, and residual stress measurements are employed to validate the models. In the area of ceramics, the entire process chain from component manufacturing, including design and component analysis, raw material processing, moulding, sintering and any post-machining, to complex component testing conditions is covered. The focus is not on the development of new materials, but rather on the improved use of reliable and cost-oriented available materials, which may be modified for a specific purpose if appropriate. Special attention is paid to complex joining problems, in particular the adhesive joints between ceramic and metallic materials and ceramic structures with metal brazes or glass solders. Safety validation and stress analysis require a number of mechanical and thermophysical material parameters and application-oriented test procedures. For their identification, the IWM has the necessary expertise and comprehensive modern facilities.

Infrastructure

For the above mentioned tasks a well-equipped technical center and labs are available. This includes powder conditioning by milling facilities such as wet milling, attritor or agitator bead mill, dry grinding fluid bed jet mill with an integrated air classifier, and mixing and granulating aggregates. Shaping operation is performed using uniaxial, isostatic or hot isostatic pressing, and field assisted sintering tchnology (FAST), respectively. For sintering up to 2200 °C various electrical sintering kilns are available, operating under air, vacuum or inert gas atmospheric conditions. This allows the production of specimens and components in small lots.

For microstructural characterization, a number of light microscopes and three SEMs are available. Open porosity can be measured by Hg-porosimetry. The thermophysical lab provides a broad and modern equipment in order to characterize thermal expansion, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity. For the mechanical characterization of ceramics, various uniaxial bending and biaxial testing rigs, such as the brittle ring, the ball-on-3-balls or the ball-on-ring test up to 1200 °C, and 22 rigs for uniaxial creep testing, are available. The spectrum of fatigue testing covers the low cycle fatigue regime for elevated temperatures and the high cycle fatigue regime up to 109 cycles with more than 35 testing machines.

Research activities

For more than 10 years the design of ceramic oxygen transport membranes (OTM) for industrial applications has been a paramount subject at IWM. Perovskite-type Ba0,5Sr0,5Co0,8Fe0,2O3-δ (BSCF) is used as mixed ionic/electronic conducting (MIEC) membrane material because of its high oxygen permeability at temperatures between 800 – 900 °C. Tubular membranes of 500 mm length, 15,5 mm diameter, and 0,9 mm wall thickness are produced through isostatic pressing. To ensure structural integrity and sufficiently high oxygen flux, microstructural properties have been optimized by adjusting powder processing (milling, mixing, granulation, mold filling and pressing operation) and sintering schemes. Today the long-term stability of these membranes is investigated under service conditions in a pilot module with 600 tubular membranes operating in three-end mode with a maximum gauge pressure of 20 bar on the feed end and 0,3 bar at the permeate end; the pilot module can provide 0,6 t oxygen per day. 

The development of application-oriented joining techniques is of major importance for practical use of ceramic components that are usually integrated in a metal environment. This applies even more to adhesive material joints. Reactive air brazing (RAB) with AgCuO brazes is a promising joining technology for OTMs used for gas separation. In these systems, mixed ion/electric conducting membrane materials, like BSCF, are used in combination with an austenitic steel for air separation in power plant processes with CO2 sequestration. At operating temperatures of 850 °C, these membrannes exhibit a reduced strength compared to room temperature. In addition, such compounds are subjected to mechanical stresses resulting from external loads and internal constraints due to temperature gradients and thermal mismatch of the joint partners. This load profile results in significant challenges to the joining technique between the functional ceramic material and the metallic components.

The mechanisms of actions causing degradation of strength and tightness during long-term use at operating temperature as well as thermomechanical fatigue during start-up and shut-down or load changes are investigated in a DFG-funded project. By targeted development of braze materials and processes the microstructural and mechanical integrity of the joint interface was improved significantly.

Following the previously introduced IDC concept, several new applications of ceramic components have been realized. Monolithic ceramic (SiSiC) centrifugal fans were developed to increase efficiency during heat treatment of non-ferrous metals in floater furnaces. By substituting the nickel alloy, the rotational speed of the fan could be doubled and the maximum service temperature was increased from 1000 – 1200 °C. A special challenge was the design of a shaft connection to the electrical drive.

For wear reduction in injection moulding and extrusion systems, ceramic augers and linings have been developed based on stress and reliability analyses. The interrelationship between microstructural and mechanical properties during powder consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and field assisted sintering technology (FAST) is another research item.
The latter is a relatively young method to achieve highly dense materials in a short period of time. In particular, sintering of ultrafine tungsten carbide-cobald hardmetals is investigated aiming to identify the sinter mechanisms and aid in the development of a continuum mechanically-based model for simulation of the consolidation process. Recently, experimental investigations into the damage evolution of novel multilayer refractory compounds during thermal cycling were initiated. The aim is to predict and optimize the thermal shock resistance through tailored microstructural design.

Contact

Prof. Dr-Ing. Christoph Broeckmann
c.broeckmann@iwm.rwth-aachen.de  

Dipl.-Ing. Alexander Bezold
a.bezold@iwm.rwth-aachen.de

Institute for Materials Applications in Mechanical Engineering (IWM)
RWTH Aachen University
Augustinerbach 4
52062 Aachen
Germany
www.iwm.rwth-aachen.de

Goals

Our focus is on industries that use ceramic components to ensure reliable processes in their plants and machinery or are considering the application of such components. The primary goal of the technical committee is not to present the potential benefits of ceramic materials and products but, as far as this falls within company interests, to present existing technical problems, discuss these problems and develop possible solutions. Important in this connection therefore is to promote communication between industry and research, which, e.g. in bi- or multilateral projects – also at the pre-competitive stage, can lead to problem solutions. Key topics at events held to date at Eirich, Friatec, Netzsch Gerätebau, Rath and Riedhammer in Germany have been the application of ceramics in corrosion and wear protection, measurement and analysis systems as well as high-temperature technology. The participation and intensive exchange of information and ideas between the numerous interested attendees are testimony to the correctness of the concept on which this technical committee is based.

Potential members

On this technical committee there are no permanent members, as is usual in other technical committees, because the attendees at the events come from very different fields depending on the topic selected for discussion. There is, however, a steering group, currently consisting of six people, which selects topics and papers, and undertakes any necessary organization.

Information channels

In line with its goals, the technical committee must ensure that its events are made known particularly to the relevant user industry. This is done predominantly with distribution of information on the current programme at relevant trade fairs and conferences, and through the use of the address data from associations. With publication of the journal “Ceramic Applications – Components for high performance” from 2013 onwards, another important instrument has been created to present the potential of ceramic materials and products for user industries.

Structure

The one-day events are held approximately every nine months, the preferred venue being an industrial enterprise connected with the technical content to be addressed at the event. Anyone interested can add themselves to the mailing list in order to obtain information on the planning of the next event in good time.

Contact

Contact partners are Chairman of the Technical Committee Helmut Mayer (helmut.mayer@friatec.de) and members of the steering group: Dr Detlev Nicklas (nicklas@dkg.de), Dr Ulrich Roger (roger@hvg-dgg.de), Dr Bärbel Voigtsberger (baerbel.voigtsberger@ikts.fraunhofer.de), Dr Gerhard Wötting (g.woetting@fct-keramik.de) and Dr Michael Zins (michael.zins@ikts.fraunhofer.de)

Ceramic materials have become firmly established in technical applications. Thanks to a growing understanding of the correct handling of modern high-performance materials, technical ceramics are used increasingly as problem solutions for challenging applications. Ceramic components exploit the specific properties of materials, delivering convincing added value with regard to durability, safety and reliability. The day-to-day experience of technical ceramics manufacturers, however, also shows that the capabilities, potential applications and cost reduction potential of technical ceramics are often not sufficiently well known or inaccurately assessed.

In spring 1996, the Ceramics Industry Association Regd. (VKI) established the Technical Ceramics Information Centre. The Information Centre works to provide potential users with more information on the potential applications and advantages of technical ceramics as a material. For this purpose, the Information Centre draws on the concentrated knowledge of the association members and in 2013, in collaboration with member organizations of the Association of the Ceramic Industry Regd., it again organized the series of seminars headed Technical Ceramics in Practical Applications for designers, development engineers, tech-nical directors and managing directors/business owners. This year’s seminars took place on 25 June in Düsseldorf, on 26 June in Stuttgart and on 27 June in Munich, and counted a total number of 150 attendees.

Specialists in different applications gave the attendees the opportunity to obtain comprehensive application-oriented information on materials and potential applications. The attendees were able to profit from the know-how of experienced professionals and the discussion of experiences with other users. Both during the breaks and parallel to the papers, they were able to discuss individually with speakers questions from their personal field of work, also on the basis of model components from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and high-voltage engineering.

The programme in 2013 included the following papers:

Overview of ceramics

Comparison of ceramic materials;
Dr. Ilka Lenke, CeramTec GmbH 
Ulrike Wiech, CeramTec-ETEC GmbH

Industrial product design:
Intelligent solutions with ceramics;
Sandra Ernst, CeramTec GmbH

Rapid Prototyping as the key to opening up new applications:
Mathias Wilde, Micro Ceram GmbH

Ceramics in combination

Using oxide ceramics in material combinations:
Roland Zils, FRIATEC AG

Increasing component complexity by joining ceramic-ceramic or ceramic-metal components: 
Aaron Makrlik, Roland Schreiber, TKC – Keramik GmbH

Taming the unruly – the ceramic-metal brazed joint:
Dr. Holger Wampers, Lapp Insulators Alumina GmbH

Ceramics in mechanical engineering

Silicon nitride – an alternative to steel and carbides:
Dr Rolf Wagner, H.C. Starck Ceramics GmbH

Ceramics: not a special but a standard material in plant and machine engineering:
Heinz Albert, Cera System Verschleissschutz GmbH

Cost-efficient production of small unit numbers with high precision – practical examples for components for complex requirements:
Dr. Torsten Prescher, Dr. Torsten Weiss, BCE Special Ceramics GmbH

Efficiency – Ceramics make the difference:
Florian Grimm, ESK Ceramics GmbH & Co. KG

Ceramics in special applications

The TRUSSCERAM modular ceramic construction set:
Sebastian Liebisch, SCHUNK Ingenieurkeramik GmbH

Exceptional problem solutions with porous ceramics:
Ulrich Werr, Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig GmbH

Piezo-electric materials and their applications:
Dr. Karsten Beck, CeramTec GmbH.

Contact

VKI Verband der Keramischen Industrie e.V.
Martin Hartmann, General Secretary
Tel.: +49 9287 808-42
Hartmann@keramverband.de
www.keramverbaende.de